Tack n' Talk

Online Equestrian Resource

Our Reader Winter Survival Tips

Presented by:  Larissa W. Cox, M.Sc. Applied Equine Science

Sometimes it’s very hard to accept horse ownership especially during the cold winter months when all you seem to be doing is dealing with keeping your horse comfortable and safe.  However, here are a few survival tips received from our readers that can help.

  1. Put thin blankets under thick blankets, or
  2. Put thin blankets over thick blankets instead of the traditional method.  They are easier to wash and much easier to mend if they get torn.  Also, a lot cheaper to replace!
  3. Put gloves everywhere:  In your car, in the tack room and in the feed room.  You’ll be glad you did.
  4. Plastic sleighs are much easier to move things around in the snow than a wheelbarrow.  Just put the items on top of the sleigh and tow it along.  Get your horse used to towing during the summer so that he can help you out during the snowy winter months.
  5. Have lock de-icer handy to open locks to trailers and padlocks.  WD40 is also handy to have around.
  6. Try putting 2-3  balls floating inside your water troughs to prevent freezing.
  7. Buy a car plug in bottle.  Plug it into your lighter and you’ll have a warm drink to sip in no time.
  8. Fill all your hay nets for the week during the weekend when it’s light outside and you can see what you’re doing.
  9. Get a headlamp that you can put on your head so you can see where you’re walking.
  10. Worried about your horse not drinking enough water during the winter months, soak his hay prior to feeding.
  11. Is the mud around the barn getting you down, use carpet remnants for your walking path.
  12. Wrap insulating tape on your rake handles to keep your hands warmer longer.
  13. Take an older pair of barn boots and put 1/2 inch sheet metal screws in the sole of the boot so you can walk anywhere and not fall down.
  14. Kitty litter under your car tires when you get stuck.

Do you have any tips you would like to share with Tack and Talk readers?  Just send them in the comment section below!

 

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3 Comments»

  aspireequestrian wrote @

15. Hand warmers (those little handy pouches that you just boil after use and they are ready to go). I put them inside my gloves in the palm of my hands and they stay put just fine. Same – toe warmers. Flat pouches that you place inside your shoes.

16. Hot water bottle! When I teach very long hours and therefore have not much physical work to keep me warm, I would have one with me either under my coat or just sitting on my lap 😉

  tackandtalk wrote @

Great ideas! I’m going to try the hot water bottle technique!

  aspireequestrian wrote @

🙂 You won’t regret 😀


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